1. text
    everythingcapecod:

Gray Seal (by RockN)

    everythingcapecod:

    Gray Seal (by RockN)

  2. text

    tokyoghettopuppy:

    あざらしの赤ちゃん 『 はじめまして 』 Baby Harp Seal-9

  3. text
    aiyestel:

"Sleepy Dog Mermaid"
By the time I got to Point No Point the Ts were in the distance though it did look like they might have made a kill. However, it wasn’t this pup, who was hauled out catching some rays. It had a couple small wounds on its chin and looked a touch skinny but wasn’t in distress, was alert (when it wasn’t sleeping) and most people (except for the one guy with a dog) gave it a wide berth. (And I shot this at 400mm so don’t worry! I stayed well back and gave it plenty of room!)

    aiyestel:

    "Sleepy Dog Mermaid"

    By the time I got to Point No Point the Ts were in the distance though it did look like they might have made a kill. However, it wasn’t this pup, who was hauled out catching some rays. It had a couple small wounds on its chin and looked a touch skinny but wasn’t in distress, was alert (when it wasn’t sleeping) and most people (except for the one guy with a dog) gave it a wide berth. (And I shot this at 400mm so don’t worry! I stayed well back and gave it plenty of room!)

  4. text

    yuki-natsu:

    This little cutie slips down a snow bank and cries, ‘Ohhhh no!’

  5. text
    aaronflybox:

Malibu Mic Test by Jennifer Stuber on Flickr.
  6. text
    alliedwhale:

Allied Whale’s Marine Mammal Stranding Response team visited Lincolnville on February 26th to assess a juvenile (yearling) harp seal (one of the species of “ice seals” that visit Maine each winter). It was on a nice stretch of ice in a marshy inlet. Consulting veterinarian Dr. Carissa Bielamowicz was among the team members who assessed the seal which was bright, alert and responsive and in good body condition. It rolled on its side and stretched its flippers enjoying its icy substrate and the sunshine. We are monitoring the seal for now and hoping our caller is enjoying watching (from a distance) her winter visitor! If you come across a seal (or any marine mammal) call us at 207-288-5644 or the stranding cell: 207-266-1326. Remember to maintain a distance of at least 150 feet from seals. Use binoculars to view them from afar. The stranding team used binoculars yesterday and used a zoom to get this “close-up” photo.

    alliedwhale:

    Allied Whale’s Marine Mammal Stranding Response team visited Lincolnville on February 26th to assess a juvenile (yearling) harp seal (one of the species of “ice seals” that visit Maine each winter). It was on a nice stretch of ice in a marshy inlet. Consulting veterinarian Dr. Carissa Bielamowicz was among the team members who assessed the seal which was bright, alert and responsive and in good body condition. It rolled on its side and stretched its flippers enjoying its icy substrate and the sunshine. We are monitoring the seal for now and hoping our caller is enjoying watching (from a distance) her winter visitor! If you come across a seal (or any marine mammal) call us at 207-288-5644 or the stranding cell: 207-266-1326. Remember to maintain a distance of at least 150 feet from seals. Use binoculars to view them from afar. The stranding team used binoculars yesterday and used a zoom to get this “close-up” photo.

  7. text
    aiyestel:

One more photo of the sleepy dog mermaid today. So cute. <3

    aiyestel:

    One more photo of the sleepy dog mermaid today. So cute. <3

  8. text
    cutestofthecute:

(via)
  9. text
    imalsoacat:

Crabeater Seal by Mariusz Potocki.Source.

    imalsoacat:

    Crabeater Seal by Mariusz Potocki.
    Source.

  10. text

→

About

Fuck yeah seals, sea lions, and walruses. And sometimes otters.

If you have a correction to any of the information or tags on a post, please don't hesitate to put it in the ask box! We also welcome submissions.

Search